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Parliamentary debates and questions

S5W-17854: Neil Findlay (Lothian)

Scottish Labour

Date lodged: 24 July 2018

To ask the Scottish Government how many people have died prematurely in each of the last five years from diseases where inactivity is a major contributory factor.

Answered by: Joe FitzPatrick 22 August 2018

The numbers of premature deaths in Scotland in the last five years from the five diseases defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as having some relation to physical inactivity are shown in the following table.

Deaths before the age of 75, by cause, 2013 to 2017

 

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Diabetes mellitus

279

309

276

373

383

Malignant neoplasm of colon

369

351

369

399

367

Malignant neoplasm of breast

567

541

537

529

528

Ischaemic heart diseases

2,630

2,472

2,566

2,552

2,580

Other heart diseases

490

541

557

552

593

Physical inactivity is one contributory factor amongst others to these diseases. Research conducted in 2012 estimated that physical inactivity contributed to 2,565 deaths per annum in Scotland, based on the estimated contribution of physical inactivity to each of these diseases.

The Scottish Government recently published our Active Scotland Delivery Plan which aims to cut physical inactivity in adults and teenagers by 15% by 2030 using wide-ranging approaches including active travel funding, support for both formal sports and informal physical activity, and partnership working across the transport, education, health and planning sectors.

The Plan contains 90 actions including development of community sports hubs in the most deprived areas; more opportunities for pupils to participate in sport before, during and after school; support and development for helping people move from school sport to clubs; increased funding for cycle and walking paths; promoting good practice to ensure children have safe places to play; and addressing barriers to women and girls participating.

Scotland is one of the first countries to publish a national action plan following the World Health Organisation’s global plan on physical activity.